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ARKEO 1200 : Ancient Peoples and Places
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 1200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A broad introduction to archaeology-the study of material remains to answer questions about the human past. Case studies highlight the variability of ancient societies and illustrate the varied methods and interpretive frameworks archaeologists use to reconstruct them. This course can serve as a platform for both archaeology and anthropology undergraduate majors.
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ARKEO 2010 : Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2010, NES 2610 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Near East is often defined by "firsts": the first cities, writing, and complex societies. Archaeology has long looked to the region for explanations of the origins of civilization. The Middle East has also long been a place where archaeology and politics are inextricably intertwined, from Europe's 19th century appropriation of the region's heritage, to the looting and destruction of antiquities in recent wars in Syria and Iraq. This introductory course moves between past and present. It offers a survey of 10,000 years of human history, from the appearance of farming villages to the dawn of imperialism, while also engaging current debates on the contemporary stakes of archaeology in the Middle East. Covering Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Iran, and the Caucasus, our focus is on past material worlds and the modern politics in which they are entangled.
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ARKEO 2215 : Stone Age Art
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2215 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
When did "art," however defined, appear during the human career, how was it produced and for what purposes? These are some of the questions we will investigate through a survey of the discovery, validation, analysis, and interpretation of the earliest art. The course will cover a variety of finds from the Old World, including the well-known cave art of southwestern France and northern Spain, and also consider portable art and decoration. The contributions of new analytical techniques and interpretive approaches are highlighted.
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ARKEO 2235 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, AMST 2350, ANTHR 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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ARKEO 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" socieites, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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ARKEO 2285 : Egyptomania: Imagining Egypt in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2285, CLASS 2685, NES 2985 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Throughout Greek and Roman history, the idea of Egypt inspired powerful imaginative responses ranging from fascination to fear. This course investigates Egyptian interactions with the Greco-Roman world and the changing Greek and Roman attitudes towards Egypt. Readings will cover subjects including the earliest Egyptian-Aegean trade, Herodotus' accounts of Egypt, Greco-Macedonian kings on the throne of the pharaohs, Roman perceptions of the notorious Cleopatra, the worship of Egyptian gods in the Greco-Roman world, and the incorporation of Egypt into the Roman empire (among other topics). Through an examination of Greek and Roman representations of Egypt, we will investigate how Greeks and Romans conceived of their own societies and cultural identities. Finally, we will also address images of Egypt in modern popular culture; how have Greco-Roman portrayals of Egypt helped shape today's view of the Pharaonic world?
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ARKEO 2522 : Drinking in the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2630, JWST 2522, NES 2522 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.
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ARKEO 2620 : Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology
Crosslisted as: LA 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.
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ARKEO 2662 : Daily Life in the Biblical World
Crosslisted as: JWST 2662, NES 2662, RELST 2662 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 2700 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2200, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York
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ARKEO 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2711, CLASS 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Roman period has given us a density of archaeological remains that remains unsurpassed in world history, and these have been studied since the very birth of archaeology. As a result, Roman archaeology allows us to explore questions that historians and archaeologists of other periods often cannot. Within this rich body of archaeological evidence, this course will focus on key themes and material for the Roman period in Italy and the Western provinces (especially Gaul and Britain). Central topics include imperialism, urbanism, economy, and social life. What was the archaeological imprint of conquest? How did goods travel around such a wide geographical expanse? What images did people in Britain have of the emperor? We will investigate particular types of evidence, from public monuments over ceramic amphorae to the road system. And we will explore methodological issues, such as what archaeological evidence can tell us, or how to introduce protagonists other than emperors and armies in our reconstructions of the Roman world. Throughout the course, we will question whether the modern world is a productive and valid parallel for archaeological study of the Roman world.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 3090 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARKEO 3210 : Historical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: AMST 3200, AMST 6210, ANTHR 3210, ANTHR 6210, ARKEO 6210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course uses artifacts, spaces, and texts to examine the emergence of the "modern world" in the 500-plus years since Columbus.  This is a distinctive sub-field of archaeology, not least because modern attitudes toward economic systems, race relations, and gender roles emerged during this period.  We will read classic and contemporary texts to unearth the physical histories of contemporary ideas, including coverage of the archaeologies of capitalism, colonialism, gender relations, the African diaspora, ethnogenesis, and conflicts over the use of the past in the present.
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ARKEO 3232 : Politics of the Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3232, ANTHR 6232, ARKEO 6232 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.
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ARKEO 4020 : Designing Archaeological Exhibits
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6020, LA 4050, LA 6050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students will learn method and theory on museum design and curation. The course also provides hands-on experience in designing and building exhibits for State Parks in the Finger Lakes. For the outreach component, students will work with staff from State Parks and Friends of the Parks.
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ARKEO 4211 : Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4211, ANTHR 6211, ARKEO 6211, NES 4544, NES 6544 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ceramics are among the most ubiquitous materials in the archaeological record. From prehistory to the present, the manipulation of clay to form pottery and other synthetic objects has transformed domains of human experience from the quotidian to the consequential. This course addresses the theories and methods that equip archaeologists to make deductions about past societies on the basis of ceramic evidence. We will examine such topics as methods of organizing and classifying ceramic data, aspects of pottery production, pottery style, form, and function, techniques of instrumental analysis, and frameworks for the interpretation of pottery that allow archaeologists to arrive at some understanding of social, political, and economic lifeways. This course entails both seminar-based instruction and hands-on laboratory skills.
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ARKEO 4246 : Human Osteology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4246, ANTHR 7246, ARKEO 7246 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.
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ARKEO 4460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 4614 : Liminality in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4614, ANTHR 6614, ARKEO 6614, NES 4914, NES 6914 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 4618 : Data Corruption's Deep History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4632, COML 4615, MEDVL 4718, SHUM 4618, STS 4618 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).
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ARKEO 6020 : Designing Archaeological Exhibits
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4020, LA 4050, LA 6050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students will learn method and theory on museum design and curation. The course also provides hands-on experience in designing and building exhibits for State Parks in the Finger Lakes. For the outreach component, students will work with staff from State Parks and Friends of the Parks.
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Description
ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.
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ARKEO 6210 : Historical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: AMST 3200, AMST 6210, ANTHR 3210, ANTHR 6210, ARKEO 3210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course uses artifacts, spaces, and texts to examine the emergence of the "modern world" in the 500-plus years since Columbus.  This is a distinctive sub-field of archaeology, not least because modern attitudes toward economic systems, race relations, and gender roles emerged during this period.  We will read classic and contemporary texts to unearth the physical histories of contemporary ideas, including coverage of the archaeologies of capitalism, colonialism, gender relations, the African diaspora, ethnogenesis, and conflicts over the use of the past in the present.
View course details
Description
ARKEO 6211 : Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4211, ANTHR 6211, ARKEO 4211, NES 4544, NES 6544 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ceramics are among the most ubiquitous materials in the archaeological record. From prehistory to the present, the manipulation of clay to form pottery and other synthetic objects has transformed domains of human experience from the quotidian to the consequential. This course addresses the theories and methods that equip archaeologists to make deductions about past societies on the basis of ceramic evidence. We will examine such topics as methods of organizing and classifying ceramic data, aspects of pottery production, pottery style, form, and function, techniques of instrumental analysis, and frameworks for the interpretation of pottery that allow archaeologists to arrive at some understanding of social, political, and economic lifeways. This course entails both seminar-based instruction and hands-on laboratory skills.
View course details
Description
ARKEO 6232 : Politics of the Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3232, ANTHR 6232, ARKEO 3232 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.
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ARKEO 6267 : Contemporary Archaeological Theory
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6267 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.
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ARKEO 6614 : Liminality in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4614, ANTHR 6614, ARKEO 4614, NES 4914, NES 6914 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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ARKEO 7246 : Human Osteology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4246, ANTHR 7246, ARKEO 4246 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.
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Description
ARKEO 7460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 4460 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 7743 : Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7743, NES 7743 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The conquests and death of Alexander served as catalysts for major cultural transformation. Throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Greco-Macedonian dynasties came to rule over foreign populations, establishing elements of Greek culture in places as diverse as Egypt, the Near East, Central Asia, and northwestern India. The resulting cultural interactions led not only to the creation of new, hybrid practices, but also new definitions of "Hellenicity." This seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of the cultural and historical developments of the Hellenistic period, with a particular emphasis on settlement archaeology and material culture. Chronologically, we will cover the period from Alexander's death in 323 BCE to the Battle of Actium in 31 BCE, when Octavian defeated Cleopatra VII to conquer the last remaining Hellenistic kingdom. We will examine the interactions between Greek and local cultures throughout the Hellenistic Mediterranean, considering material culture and iconography from both elite and popular contexts. We will also examine a range of different Hellenistic settlements, including the capital cities Alexandria and Pergamon; the important trading port of Delos; the well-preserved city of Priene; the Thessalian town of New Halos; the remote Bactrian city of Ai Khanum, in what is now Afghanistan; and the Egyptian city of Thebes, a site of frequent indigenous resistance to Greco-Macedonian rule.
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