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ARKEO 1200 : Ancient Peoples and Places
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 1200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A broad introduction to archaeology-the study of material remains to answer questions about the human past. Case studies highlight the variability of ancient societies and illustrate the varied methods and interpretive frameworks archaeologists use to reconstruct them. This course can serve as a platform for both archaeology and anthropology undergraduate majors.
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ARKEO 1702 : Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology
Crosslisted as: CLASS 1702, NES 1602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.
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ARKEO 2010 : Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2010, NES 2610 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Near East is often defined by "firsts": the first cities, writing, and complex societies. Archaeology has long looked to the region for explanations of the origins of civilization. The Middle East has also long been a place where archaeology and politics are inextricably intertwined, from Europe's 19th century appropriation of the region's heritage, to the looting and destruction of antiquities in recent wars in Syria and Iraq. This introductory course moves between past and present. It offers a survey of 10,000 years of human history, from the appearance of farming villages to the dawn of imperialism, while also engaging current debates on the contemporary stakes of archaeology in the Middle East. Covering Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Iran, and the Caucasus, our focus is on past material worlds and the modern politics in which they are entangled.
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ARKEO 2201 : Early Agriculture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in (pre)history. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture (plant and animal domestication) around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world.
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ARKEO 2215 : Stone Age Art
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2215 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
When did "art," however defined, appear during the human career, how was it produced and for what purposes? These are some of the questions we will investigate through a survey of the discovery, validation, analysis, and interpretation of the earliest art. The course will cover a variety of finds from the Old World, including the well-known cave art of southwestern France and northern Spain, and also consider portable art and decoration. The contributions of new analytical techniques and interpretive approaches are highlighted.
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ARKEO 2235 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, AMST 2350, ANTHR 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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ARKEO 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" socieites, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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ARKEO 2285 : Egyptomania: Imagining Egypt in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2285, CLASS 2685, NES 2985 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Throughout Greek and Roman history, the idea of Egypt inspired powerful imaginative responses ranging from fascination to fear. This course investigates Egyptian interactions with the Greco-Roman world and the changing Greek and Roman attitudes towards Egypt. Readings will cover subjects including the earliest Egyptian-Aegean trade, Herodotus' accounts of Egypt, Greco-Macedonian kings on the throne of the pharaohs, Roman perceptions of the notorious Cleopatra, the worship of Egyptian gods in the Greco-Roman world, and the incorporation of Egypt into the Roman empire (among other topics). Through an examination of Greek and Roman representations of Egypt, we will investigate how Greeks and Romans conceived of their own societies and cultural identities. Finally, we will also address images of Egypt in modern popular culture; how have Greco-Roman portrayals of Egypt helped shape today's view of the Pharaonic world?
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ARKEO 2522 : Drinking in the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2630, JWST 2522, NES 2522 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.
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ARKEO 2620 : Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology
Crosslisted as: LA 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.
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ARKEO 2662 : Daily Life in the Biblical World
Crosslisted as: JWST 2662, NES 2662, RELST 2662 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will survey the common and not-so-common daily activities of the world of ancient Israel, with supplementary material from its neighbors in Mesopotamia, Egypt and Canaan. Many courses cover aspects of ancient political history or ancient literature, but these often focus on the activities of members of social elites (who produced most of the writing), at the expense of the activities of more average citizens. The focus of this class is on ancient technologies, human interactions with the environment and how these play into the creation and maintenance of social systems. It will provide a broad spectrum, spanning all social classes, and many different kinds of resources and activities. Material to be covered will include topics such as food production and processing, pottery production, metallurgy, glass making, cloth production and personal adornment, implements of war, medicine, leisure time (games and music), and others.
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ARKEO 2668 : Ancient Egyptian Civilization
Crosslisted as: NES 2668 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course surveys the history and culture of pharaonic Egypt from its prehistoric origins down to the early first millennium bce. Within a chronological framework, the following themes or topics will be considered: the development of the Egyptian state (monarchy, administration, ideology), social organization (class, gender and family, slavery), economic factors, and empire and international relations.
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ARKEO 2700 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2200, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
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ARKEO 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2711, CLASS 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
With megacities, long-distance trade, and fluid identities, the Roman empire can seem uncannily close to our modern world. This course adopts a thematic approach to explore whether this is a valid parallel, based on archaeological evidence ranging from temples to farms, from wine containers to statues.
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ARKEO 2729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 2729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 3090 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARKEO 3210 : Historical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: AMST 3200, AMST 6210, ANTHR 3210, ANTHR 6210, ARKEO 6210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course uses artifacts, spaces, and texts to examine the emergence of the "modern world" in the 500-plus years since Columbus.  This is a distinctive sub-field of archaeology, not least because modern attitudes toward economic systems, race relations, and gender roles emerged during this period.  We will read classic and contemporary texts to unearth the physical histories of contemporary ideas, including coverage of the archaeologies of capitalism, colonialism, gender relations, the African diaspora, ethnogenesis, and conflicts over the use of the past in the present.
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ARKEO 3225 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3225, CLASS 3735 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
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ARKEO 3230 : Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3230, ANTHR 6230, ARKEO 6230 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems (metaphors for humans), and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.
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ARKEO 3232 : Politics of the Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3232, ANTHR 6232, ARKEO 6232 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.
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ARKEO 3235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  
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ARKEO 3248 : Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3248, AIIS 6248, AMST 3248, AMST 6248, ANTHR 3248, ANTHR 6248, ARKEO 6248 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell's home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.
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ARKEO 3255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3255, ANTHR 6255, ARKEO 6255, LATA 3550, LATA 6255 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.
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ARKEO 3520 : Kingship and State-Making in Asia
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3520, ASIAN 3362 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Kingship plays an outsize role in Asian countries today, in both democratic and authoritarian countries. Even in countries that abolished the monarchy, the legacy of kingship is very much at play. In this course we will study Asia's kingdoms, states, and empires, with attention to both tradition and present-day modern states. Focusing on kingship as both ideology and practice, we will study how states and monarchic traditions first came to be, including as Stranger-Kings, Buddhist monarchs, secondary state formation, local adaptations of foreign models, and more. We will examine examples such as China, from the ancient states and early empires to the legacy of empire there today; Cambodia and its Angkor empire modeled on Indian traditions; as well as Burma, Thailand, Japan, and other parts of Asia. Using readings, films, lectures and guest presentations, we will re-examine the role of kingship in Asia so as to enable a new understanding of both ancient, historical, and contemporary Asia.
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ARKEO 3600 : Pre-Industrial Cities and Towns in North America
Crosslisted as: CRP 3600, CRP 6660, LA 3600, LA 6660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations as well as diverse European cultures have all exerted their influences on the organization of town and city living. The course considers how each culture has altered the landscape in its own unique way as it created its own built environments.
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ARKEO 3661 : Sumerian Language and Culture I
Crosslisted as: SUMER 3661 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is an intense introduction for undergraduate and graduate students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, and its cuneiform script. Each week will feature grammar lessons and a reading of an important Sumerian historical or literary work in English translation. Through lecture and discussion, the class will explore the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory, the origins of Mesopotamian civilization, and the role of the central government in the development of writing.
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ARKEO 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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ARKEO 3800 : Introduction to the Arts of China
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3800, ASIAN 3383 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of the art and culture of China, from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We begin with an inquiry into the meaning of national boundaries and the controversy of the Han Chinese people, which helps us identify the scope of Chinese culture. Pre-dynastic (or prehistoric) Chinese culture is presented through both legends about the origins of the Chinese, and scientifically excavated artifacts. Art of the dynastic and modern periods is presented in light of contemporaneous social, political, geographical, philosophical and religious contexts. Students work directly with objects in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.
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ARKEO 4020 : Designing Archaeological Exhibits
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6020, LA 4050, LA 6050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students will learn method and theory on museum design and curation. The course also provides hands-on experience in designing and building exhibits for State Parks in the Finger Lakes. For the outreach component, students will work with staff from State Parks and Friends of the Parks.
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ARKEO 4045 : Ethical Issues in Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4045, ANTHR 7045, ARKEO 7045 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How might archaeology contribute to a more humane world? Recognizing that archaeology is an inherently political activity, we will examine and actively debate some of the major ethical issues that confront practitioners navigating the complex responsibilities, roles, and praxis associated with archaeology. We will consider the multiple stakeholders in the archaeological endeavor—students, professional colleagues, public land managers, avocationalists, collectors, members of local communities, members of descendant communities, and so forth. Topics to be addressed include professional codes of archaeological ethics; equity and safety issues in archaeology; approaches to cultural resource and heritage management; the antiquities trade; and collaboration and community engagement. This course will involve active debate of ethical issues in archaeology, including case studies for the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Ethics Bowl.
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ARKEO 4211 : Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4211, ANTHR 6211, ARKEO 6211, NES 4544, NES 6544 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ceramics are among the most ubiquitous materials in the archaeological record. From prehistory to the present, the manipulation of clay to form pottery and other synthetic objects has transformed domains of human experience from the quotidian to the consequential. This course addresses the theories and methods that equip archaeologists to make deductions about past societies on the basis of ceramic evidence. We will examine such topics as methods of organizing and classifying ceramic data, aspects of pottery production, pottery style, form, and function, techniques of instrumental analysis, and frameworks for the interpretation of pottery that allow archaeologists to arrive at some understanding of social, political, and economic lifeways. This course entails both seminar-based instruction and hands-on laboratory skills.
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ARKEO 4240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4240, ANTHR 7240, ARKEO 7240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.
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ARKEO 4246 : Human Osteology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4246, ANTHR 7246, ARKEO 7246 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.
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ARKEO 4256 : Time and History in Ancient Mexico
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4256, LATA 4250 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to belief systems in ancient Mexico and Central America, emphasizing the blending of religion, astrology, myth, history, and prophecy. Interpreting text and image in pre-Columbian books and inscriptions is a major focus.
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ARKEO 4353 : Ephesos, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Situated on the west coast of Anatolia (or Asia Minor), modern Turkey, Ephesos was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from the 7th century BCE to the 14th century CE, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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ARKEO 4460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ARKEO 4558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6558, ARTH 4558, ARTH 6558, JWST 4558, JWST 9558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
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ARKEO 4614 : Marginal Archaeology: Liminality and the Power of Borders in the Maritime Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4614, ANTHR 6614, ARKEO 6614, NES 4914, NES 6914 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar students apply Victor Turner's conceptions of liminality and anti-structure to the past. From the Bronze Age to the present, shamans, merchants, and travelers who ostensibly look like outsiders have played crucial historical roles. By exploiting geographical and socio-political boundaries to transform the status of individuals and groups, such liminal agents fostered wealth and status accumulation, complexity, inter-societal networks, and collapse. In a sense we are exploring the power of the margin and the marginalized in history. Our sources include shipwrecks, flood mythologies, biblical narratives, Egyptian and Mesopotamian literature, the rise of capitalism, and heroic sagas.  In the Near East and Mediterranean regions these liminalities involve bodies of water to an impressive degree. Indeed, the Latin base of liminality, limen ('threshold'), derives from the ancient Greek for harbor. This seminar then focuses a liminal perspective on questions of maritime history, anthropology and archaeology, and may be approached as a continuation of such coursework; however, there are no formal prerequisites.
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ARKEO 4618 : Data Corruption's Deep History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4632, COML 4615, MEDVL 4718, SHUM 4618, STS 4618 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How can studying the deep past of information storage and transmission help us understand our current engagements with information and contemplate its future? In this course we will we will explore the materiality of information-bearing artifacts over the long history of semantic inscription. From cuneiform tablets to digital media (whose veneer of immateriality disguises the complexities of the material mechanisms of storage and transmission), we will study the shifting materialities of the matrices through which information is stored, transformed, shared, and obliterated: compilations and remixes, piracies and hacks, inscribed objects and their digital "surrogates."
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ARKEO 4644 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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ARKEO 4981 : Honors Thesis Research
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Independent work under the close guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 4982 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The student, under faculty direction, will prepare a senior thesis.
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ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).
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ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).
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ARKEO 6020 : Designing Archaeological Exhibits
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4020, LA 4050, LA 6050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students will learn method and theory on museum design and curation. The course also provides hands-on experience in designing and building exhibits for State Parks in the Finger Lakes. For the outreach component, students will work with staff from State Parks and Friends of the Parks.
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ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.
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ARKEO 6210 : Historical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: AMST 3200, AMST 6210, ANTHR 3210, ANTHR 6210, ARKEO 3210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course uses artifacts, spaces, and texts to examine the emergence of the "modern world" in the 500-plus years since Columbus.  This is a distinctive sub-field of archaeology, not least because modern attitudes toward economic systems, race relations, and gender roles emerged during this period.  We will read classic and contemporary texts to unearth the physical histories of contemporary ideas, including coverage of the archaeologies of capitalism, colonialism, gender relations, the African diaspora, ethnogenesis, and conflicts over the use of the past in the present.
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ARKEO 6211 : Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4211, ANTHR 6211, ARKEO 4211, NES 4544, NES 6544 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ceramics are among the most ubiquitous materials in the archaeological record. From prehistory to the present, the manipulation of clay to form pottery and other synthetic objects has transformed domains of human experience from the quotidian to the consequential. This course addresses the theories and methods that equip archaeologists to make deductions about past societies on the basis of ceramic evidence. We will examine such topics as methods of organizing and classifying ceramic data, aspects of pottery production, pottery style, form, and function, techniques of instrumental analysis, and frameworks for the interpretation of pottery that allow archaeologists to arrive at some understanding of social, political, and economic lifeways. This course entails both seminar-based instruction and hands-on laboratory skills.
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ARKEO 6230 : Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3230, ANTHR 6230, ARKEO 3230 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems (metaphors for humans), and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.
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ARKEO 6232 : Politics of the Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3232, ANTHR 6232, ARKEO 3232 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.
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ARKEO 6235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 3235 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.
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ARKEO 6248 : Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3248, AIIS 6248, AMST 3248, AMST 6248, ANTHR 3248, ANTHR 6248, ARKEO 3248 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell's home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.
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ARKEO 6255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3255, ANTHR 6255, ARKEO 3255, LATA 3550, LATA 6255 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.
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ARKEO 6267 : Contemporary Archaeological Theory
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6267 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.
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ARKEO 6558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4558, ARTH 4558, ARTH 6558, JWST 4558, JWST 9558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 6614 : Liminality in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4614, ANTHR 6614, ARKEO 4614, NES 4914, NES 6914 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar students apply Victor Turner's conceptions of liminality and anti-structure to the past. From the Bronze Age to the present, shamans, merchants, and travelers who ostensibly look like outsiders have played crucial historical roles. By exploiting geographical and socio-political boundaries to transform the status of individuals and groups, such liminal agents fostered wealth and status accumulation, complexity, inter-societal networks, and collapse. In a sense we are exploring the power of the margin and the marginalized in history. Our sources include shipwrecks, flood mythologies, biblical narratives, Egyptian and Mesopotamian literature, the rise of capitalism, and heroic sagas.  In the Near East and Mediterranean regions these liminalities involve bodies of water to an impressive degree. Indeed, the Latin base of liminality, limen ('threshold'), derives from the ancient Greek for harbor. This seminar then focuses a liminal perspective on questions of maritime history, anthropology and archaeology, and may be approached as a continuation of such coursework; however, there are no formal prerequisites.
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ARKEO 6644 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, CLASS 4744, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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ARKEO 6729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, CLASS 2729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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ARKEO 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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ARKEO 7030 : The Caucasus: Captives, Cultures, Crossroads
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4030, ANTHR 7030, NES 4530, NES 6530 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Caucasus occupies a distinctive place within both the ancient and modern imagination. It is a region long anchored to tropes of disobedience, punishment, and redemption. It is also a place in which liminality, betwixt and between Europe and Asia, endures as both a perceived geographic imaginary and an experienced condition in the detritus of imperialisms past. The Caucasus's extraordinary diversity in languages and ethnicities has generated a deep suspicion of it by those surrounding the region, and has sparked profound social tragedies. But it has also stimulated a curiosity that has generated meditations on culture, identity, and social life. This course explores the Caucasus through its archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, music, and film. We will examine the entanglement of the region's history with its internal and external representations in order to get a sense of the array of forces shaping the Caucasus today.
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ARKEO 7045 : Ethical Issues in Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4045, ANTHR 7045, ARKEO 4045 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How might archaeology contribute to a more humane world? Recognizing that archaeology is an inherently political activity, we will examine and actively debate some of the major ethical issues that confront practitioners navigating the complex responsibilities, roles, and praxis associated with archaeology. We will consider the multiple stakeholders in the archaeological endeavor—students, professional colleagues, public land managers, avocationalists, collectors, members of local communities, members of descendant communities, and so forth. Topics to be addressed include professional codes of archaeological ethics; equity and safety issues in archaeology; approaches to cultural resource and heritage management; the antiquities trade; and collaboration and community engagement. This course will involve active debate of ethical issues in archaeology, including case studies for the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Ethics Bowl.
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ARKEO 7240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4240, ANTHR 7240, ARKEO 4240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.
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ARKEO 7246 : Human Osteology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4246, ANTHR 7246, ARKEO 4246 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.
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ARKEO 7353 : Ephesos, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Situated on the west coast of Anatolia (or Asia Minor), modern Turkey, Ephesos was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from the 7th century BCE to the 14th century CE, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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ARKEO 7460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 4460 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ARKEO 7743 : Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7743, NES 7743 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The conquests and death of Alexander served as catalysts for major cultural transformation. Throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Greco-Macedonian dynasties came to rule over foreign populations, establishing elements of Greek culture in places as diverse as Egypt, the Near East, Central Asia, and northwestern India. The resulting cultural interactions led not only to the creation of new, hybrid practices, but also new definitions of "Hellenicity." This seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of the cultural and historical developments of the Hellenistic period, with a particular emphasis on settlement archaeology and material culture. Chronologically, we will cover the period from Alexander's death in 323 BCE to the Battle of Actium in 31 BCE, when Octavian defeated Cleopatra VII to conquer the last remaining Hellenistic kingdom. We will examine the interactions between Greek and local cultures throughout the Hellenistic Mediterranean, considering material culture and iconography from both elite and popular contexts.
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ARKEO 7756 : The Roman Economy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7756 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did a large-scale pre-industrial empire like the Roman feed its citizens? How were its consumer goods produced and traded? How did town and countryside engage in this trade? Can we detect economic growth in the Roman world? What was the role of standardization? Was the Roman economy anything like the modern one, and can we use modern economic theory to study its dynamics? This course examines central questions in the study of the Roman economy, with a particular emphasis on theoretical and epistemological assumptions, and on assessing the potential of different types of evidence.
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