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ARKEO 1200 : Ancient Peoples and Places
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 1200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A broad introduction to archaeology-the study of material remains to answer questions about the human past. Case studies highlight the variability of ancient societies and illustrate the varied methods and interpretive frameworks archaeologists use to reconstruct them. This course can serve as a platform for both archaeology and anthropology undergraduate majors.
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ARKEO 1702 : Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology
Crosslisted as: CLASS 1702, NES 1602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.
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ARKEO 2201 : Early Agriculture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in (pre)history. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture (plant and animal domestication) around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world.
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ARKEO 2235 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, AMST 2350, ANTHR 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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ARKEO 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2245, BSOC 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" societies, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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ARKEO 2430 : The Rise and Fall of Civilization
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2430 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The emergence of what has come to be called "civilization" marks a profound transformation in human culture, society, politics, economy, and psychology. The first civlizations have been variously described as the point of origin for artistic achievement and the genesis of social struggle, a victory over the state of nature and the source of human neurosis, the genealogical root of social inequality and the foundation for the rule of law. In this course we will examine the rise and fall of ancient "civilizations" at the same time as we interrogate the rise and fall of the concept of civilization itself in modern historical thought. Our primary focus will be a comparative archaeological examination of five pivotal case studies of early civilization: Mesopotamia (Sumer), Egypt, China, the Indus Valley, and the Maya lowlands. Alongside our explorations of these early civilizations, we will undertake a critical examination of current key issues in political anthropology, including the nature of kingship, the origins of cities, and the role of coercion in the formation of early polities. The course will examine the spread of "civilization", including the development of "secondary states", early empires, and the first world systems. We will conclude the class wth an examination of the concept of civilization itself, its historical roots and its current prominence in geopolitical thinking and policy making. The goal of the class is to provide students with an understanding of the nature of the world's first civilizations and the potency of their contemporary legacy.
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ARKEO 2610 : Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology
Crosslisted as: CRP 2610, LA 2610 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Urban archaeologists study American Indian, colonial, and 19th-century sties that now lie within the boundaries of modern cities. The course explores how urban centers evolve, what lies beneath today's cities, and how various cultures have altered the urban landscape. Students participate in a local, historical archaeological excavation.
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ARKEO 2620 : Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology
Crosslisted as: LA 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.
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ARKEO 2661 : Ancient Ships and Seafaring: Introduction to Nautical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: NES 2661 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A survey of the history and development of ships and seafaring as revealed by shipwrecks, boat burials, texts, art, and other evidence. The role of nautical technology and seafaring among the maritime peoples of the ancient Mediterranean world-Canaanites, Minoans, Mycenaeans, Phoenicians, Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans-and the riverine cultures of Mesopotamia and Egypt is addressed. The survey stretches from the earliest evidence for Mediterranean seafaring around 10,000 bce to the first transatlantic voyages in the 15th century, including Arab, Viking, and European explorers, and the birth of modern capitalism in the Italian Maritime Republics. Along the way, economics, war, exploration, cult, life at sea, and colonization are discussed.
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ARKEO 2668 : Ancient Egyptian Civilization
Crosslisted as: NES 2668 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course surveys the history and culture of pharaonic Egypt from its prehistoric origins down to the early first millennium bce. Within a chronological framework, the following themes or topics will be considered: the development of the Egyptian state (monarchy, administration, ideology), social organization (class, gender and family, slavery), economic factors, and empire and international relations.
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ARKEO 2700 : Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2200, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What is the origin of the Olympic games? Why are the most famous Greek vases found in Italy? What was the "worlds' first computer" used for? What can a brick tell us about still standing Roman buildings? This course on the art and archaeology of ancient Greece and Rome will address all these questions. Covering the time span from the Bronze Age (3rd millennium BCE) to the time of Constantine the Great (4th century CE), the class will focus on one object or monument per lecture and how it can be considered exemplary for its time. Students learn about and practice different ways of how to look at and analyze material evidence.
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ARKEO 2729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 2729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 3090 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARKEO 3225 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3225, CLASS 3735 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
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ARKEO 3230 : Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3230, ANTHR 6230, ARKEO 6230 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems (metaphors for humans), and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.
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ARKEO 3235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  
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ARKEO 3248 : Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3248, AIIS 6248, AMST 3248, AMST 6248, ANTHR 3248, ANTHR 6248, ARKEO 6248 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell's home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.
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ARKEO 3255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3255, ANTHR 6255, ARKEO 6255, LATA 3550, LATA 6255 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.
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ARKEO 3520 : Kingship and State-Making in Asia
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3520, ANTHR 6520, ASIAN 3362, ASIAN 6652 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Kingship plays an outsize role in Asian countries today, in both democratic and authoritarian countries. Even in countries that abolished the monarchy, the legacy of kingship is very much at play. In this course we will study Asia's kingdoms, states, and empires, with attention to both tradition and present-day modern states. Focusing on kingship as both ideology and practice, we will study how states and monarchic traditions first came to be, including as Stranger-Kings, Buddhist monarchs, secondary state formation, local adaptations of foreign models, and more. We will examine examples such as China, from the ancient states and early empires to the legacy of empire there today; Cambodia and its Angkor empire modeled on Indian traditions; as well as Burma, Thailand, Japan, and other parts of Asia. Using readings, films, lectures and guest presentations, we will re-examine the role of kingship in Asia so as to enable a new understanding of both ancient, historical, and contemporary Asia.
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ARKEO 3550 : Origins of Monotheism
Crosslisted as: JWST 3550, NES 3550, RELST 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 3566 : Art and Architecture of the Pre-Columbian Americas
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3566, LATA 3566, LSP 3566, VISST 3566 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the arts of the ancient Americas from circa 2000 BC to the Spanish invasions of the 15th and 16th centuries. The inhabitants of the Americas produced outstanding works of art and architecture that showcased their diverse aesthetic contributions.  This course covers the arts of indigenous Mesoamerica (Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras), the Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and the Greater and Lesser Antilles), and Andean South America (Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile).  Students will become familiar with the history, archaeology, and visual arts of the earliest cultures that populated these regions up through the Inca, Aztec, and Maya cultures that encountered the Spaniards.  This course will also explore the legacies of pre-Columbian art in colonial, modern, and contemporary Latin America.
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ARKEO 3600 : Pre-Industrial Cities and Towns in North America
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6660, CRP 3600, CRP 6660, LA 3600, LA 6660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations as well as diverse European cultures have all exerted their influences on the organization of town and city living. The course considers how each culture has altered the landscape in its own unique way as it created its own built environments.
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ARKEO 3661 : Sumerian Language and Culture I
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6661, SUMER 3661, SUMER 6661 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is an intense introduction for undergraduate and graduate students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, and its cuneiform script. Each week will feature grammar lessons and a reading of an important Sumerian historical or literary work in English translation. Through lecture and discussion, the class will explore the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory, the origins of Mesopotamian civilization, and the role of the central government in the development of writing.
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ARKEO 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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ARKEO 3800 : Introduction to the Arts of China
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3800, ASIAN 3383 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of the art and culture of China, from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We begin with an inquiry into the meaning of national boundaries and the controversy of the Han Chinese people, which helps us identify the scope of Chinese culture. Pre-dynastic (or prehistoric) Chinese culture is presented through both legends about the origins of the Chinese, and scientifically excavated artifacts. Art of the dynastic and modern periods is presented in light of contemporaneous social, political, geographical, philosophical and religious contexts. Students work directly with objects in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.
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ARKEO 4030 : The Caucasus: Captives, Cultures, Crossroads
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4030, ANTHR 7030, ARKEO 7030, NES 4530, NES 6530 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Caucasus occupies a distinctive place within both the ancient and modern imagination. It is a region long anchored to tropes of disobedience, punishment, and redemption. It is also a place in which liminality, betwixt and between Europe and Asia, endures as both a perceived geographic imaginary and an experienced condition in the detritus of imperialisms past. The Caucasus's extraordinary diversity in languages and ethnicities has generated a deep suspicion of it by those surrounding the region, and has sparked profound social tragedies. But it has also stimulated a curiosity that has generated meditations on culture, identity, and social life. This course explores the Caucasus through its archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, music, and film. We will examine the entanglement of the region's history with its internal and external representations in order to get a sense of the array of forces shaping the Caucasus today.
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ARKEO 4045 : Ethical Issues in Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4045, ANTHR 7045, ARKEO 7045 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How might archaeology contribute to a more humane world? Recognizing that archaeology is an inherently political activity, we will examine and actively debate some of the major ethical issues that confront practitioners navigating the complex responsibilities, roles, and praxis associated with archaeology. We will consider the multiple stakeholders in the archaeological endeavor—students, professional colleagues, public land managers, avocationalists, collectors, members of local communities, members of descendant communities, and so forth. Topics to be addressed include professional codes of archaeological ethics; equity and safety issues in archaeology; approaches to cultural resource and heritage management; the antiquities trade; and collaboration and community engagement. This course will involve active debate of ethical issues in archaeology, including case studies for the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Ethics Bowl.
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ARKEO 4162 : The Inca Empire and its Colonial Legacies
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6162, ARTH 4162, ARTH 6162, LATA 4162, LATA 6162, VISST 4162 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the art and architecture of the Inca Empire (ca. 1438-1532), the largest indigenous empire in the Americas prior to the Spanish conquest. The first half of the course explores architecture, monuments, and portable arts from Cuzco, the capital of the empire, as well as smaller coastal and highland cities, to understand the complexities of Inca imperial aesthetics and their role in the administration of nearly 10 million inhabitants along the Andes mountain chain of South America. The second half of the course examines artistic production in modern-day Peru, Bolivia, and Chile during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Special attention will be given to the visual codification of collective memories of the Incas during the post-conquest era.
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ARKEO 4216 : Maya History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4216, ANTHR 6256, ARKEO 6256, LATA 4215, LATA 6256 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.
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ARKEO 4227 : Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4227, ANTHR 7227, ARKEO 7227 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will "put flesh on the bones" and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and 'third gender'; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.
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ARKEO 4233 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6233, ARTH 4233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 4746, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Fall 18 topic: Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Art and Archaeology of the Roman provinces as a 'sub-field' of Roman Archaeology has only recently gained traction in US academia, whereas in many European countries it still provides master narratives for national(ist) histories. Yet, in the wake of post-colonialism, the Roman provinces have proven fertile ground for more critical and theoretically informed archaeologies and art histories. What still needs more attention is the connectivity across provinces. The seminar therefore adopts a deliberately decentralized perspective. In looking at landscapes; infra-structure; production sites; military camps; the country side; urban centers; the material culture of domestic life and of the funerary realm, of religion, of gender and ethnicity we will emphasize interaction beyond or evading Rome. Rather than offering a systematic overview, the seminar proposes several lines of inquiry. Their main purpose is to interrogate the validity of several boundaries (geographical, methodological, theoretical, historiographical and institutional) that continue to define the field.
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ARKEO 4240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4240, ANTHR 7240, ARKEO 7240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.
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ARKEO 4256 : Time and History in Ancient Mexico
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4256, ANTHR 7250, ARKEO 7250, LATA 4250, LATA 7250 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to belief systems in ancient Mexico and Central America, emphasizing the blending of religion, astrology, myth, history, and prophecy. Interpreting text and image in pre-Columbian books and inscriptions is a major focus.
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ARKEO 4263 : Zooarchaeological Method
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4263, ANTHR 7263, ARKEO 7263 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification. We will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels. While we will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America. This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting. You will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones. It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 4264/ARKEO 4264) offered in the spring.
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ARKEO 4272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, AMST 6272, ANTHR 4272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 7272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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ARKEO 4353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from  prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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ARKEO 4558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6558, ARTH 4558, ARTH 6558, JWST 4558, JWST 6558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
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ARKEO 4644 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).
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ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.
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ARKEO 6162 : The Inca Empire and its Colonial Legacies
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4162, ARTH 4162, ARTH 6162, LATA 4162, LATA 6162, VISST 4162 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the art and architecture of the Inca Empire (ca. 1438-1532), the largest indigenous empire in the Americas prior to the Spanish conquest. The first half of the course explores architecture, monuments, and portable arts from Cuzco, the capital of the empire, as well as smaller coastal and highland cities, to understand the complexities of Inca imperial aesthetics and their role in the administration of nearly 10 million inhabitants along the Andes mountain chain of South America. The second half of the course examines artistic production in modern-day Peru, Bolivia, and Chile during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Special attention will be given to the visual codification of collective memories of the Incas during the post-conquest era.
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ARKEO 6230 : Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3230, ANTHR 6230, ARKEO 3230 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems (metaphors for humans), and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.
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ARKEO 6233 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4233, ARTH 4233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 4746, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Topics rotate each semester.  Fall 18 topic: Archaeology of the Roman Provincs.
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ARKEO 6235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 3235 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.
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ARKEO 6248 : Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3248, AIIS 6248, AMST 3248, AMST 6248, ANTHR 3248, ANTHR 6248, ARKEO 3248 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell's home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.
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ARKEO 6255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3255, ANTHR 6255, ARKEO 3255, LATA 3550, LATA 6255 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.
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ARKEO 6256 : Maya History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4216, ANTHR 6256, ARKEO 4216, LATA 4215, LATA 6256 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.
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ARKEO 6267 : Contemporary Archaeological Theory
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6267 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.
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ARKEO 6402 : Material Theory II: Assemblage & Object
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores recent efforts to theorize the materiality of human social, political, and cultural life. We will draw broadly from contemporary works in archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, art, social thought, media studies, and literary theory to piece together a sense of the conceptual possibilities afforded by analytical engagement with the world of things. We will take the historical dynamics of things as our central concern, navigating between classic and contemporary debates over the social location, physical constitution, and agency of object worlds. Along the way we will take in contemporary arguments for objects as constitutive elements of mind, affect, and order. The goal of the course is to juxtapose the experience, perception, and imagination of objects in order to address critical gaps in our understanding of social life past, present, and future. As the second course in a sequence focused on material theory, this seminar is part of a wider effort to train students to be astute analysts of the material world.
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ARKEO 6558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4558, ARTH 4558, ARTH 6558, JWST 4558, JWST 6558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
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ARKEO 6644 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, CLASS 4744, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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ARKEO 6660 : Pre-Industrial Cities and Towns in North America
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3600, CRP 3600, CRP 6660, LA 3600, LA 6660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations as well as diverse European cultures have all exerted their influences on the organization of town and city living. The course considers how each culture has altered the landscape in its own unique way as it created its own built environments.
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ARKEO 6661 : Sumerian Language and Culture I
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3661, SUMER 3661, SUMER 6661 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is an intense introduction for undergraduate and graduate students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, and its cuneiform script. Each week will feature grammar lessons and a reading of an important Sumerian historical or literary work in English translation. Through lecture and discussion, the class will explore the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory, the origins of Mesopotamian civilization, and the role of the central government in the development of writing.
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ARKEO 6729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, CLASS 2729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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ARKEO 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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ARKEO 7030 : The Caucasus: Captives, Cultures, Crossroads
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4030, ANTHR 7030, ARKEO 4030, NES 4530, NES 6530 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Caucasus occupies a distinctive place within both the ancient and modern imagination. It is a region long anchored to tropes of disobedience, punishment, and redemption. It is also a place in which liminality, betwixt and between Europe and Asia, endures as both a perceived geographic imaginary and an experienced condition in the detritus of imperialisms past. The Caucasus's extraordinary diversity in languages and ethnicities has generated a deep suspicion of it by those surrounding the region, and has sparked profound social tragedies. But it has also stimulated a curiosity that has generated meditations on culture, identity, and social life. This course explores the Caucasus through its archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, music, and film. We will examine the entanglement of the region's history with its internal and external representations in order to get a sense of the array of forces shaping the Caucasus today.
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ARKEO 7045 : Ethical Issues in Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4045, ANTHR 7045, ARKEO 4045 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How might archaeology contribute to a more humane world? Recognizing that archaeology is an inherently political activity, we will examine and actively debate some of the major ethical issues that confront practitioners navigating the complex responsibilities, roles, and praxis associated with archaeology. We will consider the multiple stakeholders in the archaeological endeavor—students, professional colleagues, public land managers, avocationalists, collectors, members of local communities, members of descendant communities, and so forth. Topics to be addressed include professional codes of archaeological ethics; equity and safety issues in archaeology; approaches to cultural resource and heritage management; the antiquities trade; and collaboration and community engagement. This course will involve active debate of ethical issues in archaeology, including case studies for the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Ethics Bowl.
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ARKEO 7227 : Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4227, ANTHR 7227, ARKEO 4227 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will "put flesh on the bones" and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and 'third gender'; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.
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ARKEO 7240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4240, ANTHR 7240, ARKEO 4240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.
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ARKEO 7250 : Time and History in Ancient Mexico
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4256, ANTHR 7250, ARKEO 4256, LATA 4250, LATA 7250 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Explores the ways Mesoamericans understood the world and their place in it, and the ways they constructed history as these are reflected in the few books that have survived from the period before the European invasion. Examines the structure of writing and systems of notation, especially calendars, and considers their potential for illuminating Mesoamerican world views and approaches to history.  Primary focus is detailed analysis of five precolumbian books: Codex Borgia, a central Mexican manual of divinatory ritual; Codex Boturini, a history of migration in central Mexico; Codex Nuttall, a Mixtec dynastic history; and two Maya books of astrology and divination, Codex Dresden and Codex Madrid.
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ARKEO 7263 : Zooarchaeological Method
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4263, ANTHR 7263, ARKEO 4263 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites.  It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification.  The course will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels.  While students will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America.  This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting.  Students will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones.  It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 7264/ARKEO 7264) offered in the spring.
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ARKEO 7272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, AMST 6272, ANTHR 4272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 4272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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ARKEO 7353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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ARKEO 7756 : The Roman Economy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7756 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did a large-scale pre-industrial empire like the Roman feed its citizens? How were its consumer goods produced and traded? How did town and countryside engage in this trade? Can we detect economic growth in the Roman world? What was the role of standardization? Was the Roman economy anything like the modern one, and can we use modern economic theory to study its dynamics? This course examines central questions in the study of the Roman economy, with a particular emphasis on theoretical and epistemological assumptions, and on assessing the potential of different types of evidence.
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