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ARKEO 1200 : Ancient Peoples and Places
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 1200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A broad introduction to archaeology-the study of material remains to answer questions about the human past. Case studies highlight the variability of ancient societies and illustrate the varied methods and interpretive frameworks archaeologists use to reconstruct them. This course can serve as a platform for both archaeology and anthropology undergraduate majors.
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ARKEO 2165 : They Were What They Ate: Food in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2165 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are," wrote renowned gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1825. Since then, it has become axiomatic within anthropology that social relationships are constructed through food-related practices and embodied in food, from the most basic tasks of acquiring food resources to the social and political contexts of the consumption of food and drink. In this course, we will consider the theoretical and methodological approaches that archaeologists use to study food and eating in ancient societies from a global anthropological perspective. Topics to be addressed include transitions to agriculture; ritual foodways; feasting and politics; gender and identity; colonialism; and food scarcity. Readings will include a range of Old and New World case studies.
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ARKEO 2201 : Early Agriculture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in (pre)history. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture (plant and animal domestication) around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world.
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ARKEO 2235 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, AMST 2350, ANTHR 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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ARKEO 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2245, BSOC 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" societies, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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ARKEO 2430 : The Rise and Fall of Civilization
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2430 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The emergence of what has come to be called "civilization" marks a profound transformation in human culture, society, politics, economy, and psychology. The first civlizations have been variously described as the point of origin for artistic achievement and the genesis of social struggle, a victory over the state of nature and the source of human neurosis, the genealogical root of social inequality and the foundation for the rule of law. In this course we will examine the rise and fall of ancient "civilizations" at the same time as we interrogate the rise and fall of the concept of civilization itself in modern historical thought. Our primary focus will be a comparative archaeological examination of five pivotal case studies of early civilization: Mesopotamia (Sumer), Egypt, China, the Indus Valley, and the Maya lowlands. Alongside our explorations of these early civilizations, we will undertake a critical examination of current key issues in political anthropology, including the nature of kingship, the origins of cities, and the role of coercion in the formation of early polities. The course will examine the spread of "civilization", including the development of "secondary states", early empires, and the first world systems. We will conclude the class wth an examination of the concept of civilization itself, its historical roots and its current prominence in geopolitical thinking and policy making. The goal of the class is to provide students with an understanding of the nature of the world's first civilizations and the potency of their contemporary legacy.
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ARKEO 2610 : Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology
Crosslisted as: CRP 2610, LA 2610 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Urban archaeologists study American Indian, colonial, and 19th-century sties that now lie within the boundaries of modern cities. The course explores how urban centers evolve, what lies beneath today's cities, and how various cultures have altered the urban landscape. Students participate in a local, historical archaeological excavation.
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ARKEO 2620 : Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology
Crosslisted as: LA 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.
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ARKEO 2661 : Ancient Ships and Seafaring: Introduction to Nautical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: NES 2661 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A survey of the history and development of ships and seafaring as revealed by shipwrecks, boat burials, texts, art, and other evidence. The role of nautical technology and seafaring among the maritime peoples of the ancient Mediterranean world-Canaanites, Minoans, Mycenaeans, Phoenicians, Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans-and the riverine cultures of Mesopotamia and Egypt is addressed. The survey stretches from the earliest evidence for Mediterranean seafaring around 10,000 bce to the first transatlantic voyages in the 15th century, including Arab, Viking, and European explorers, and the birth of modern capitalism in the Italian Maritime Republics. Along the way, economics, war, exploration, cult, life at sea, and colonization are discussed.
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ARKEO 2668 : Ancient Egyptian Civilization
Crosslisted as: NES 2668 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The course surveys the history and culture of pharaonic Egypt from its prehistoric origins down to the early first millennium bce. Within a chronological framework, the following themes or topics will be considered: the development of the Egyptian state (monarchy, administration, ideology), social organization (class, gender and family, slavery), economic factors, and empire and international relations.
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ARKEO 2700 : Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2200, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What is the origin of the Olympic games? Why are the most famous Greek vases found in Italy? What was the "worlds' first computer" used for? What can a brick tell us about still standing Roman buildings? This course on the art and archaeology of ancient Greece and Rome will address all these questions. Covering the time span from the Bronze Age (3rd millennium BCE) to the time of Constantine the Great (4th century CE), the class will focus on one object or monument per lecture and how it can be considered exemplary for its time. Students learn about and practice different ways of how to look at and analyze material evidence.
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ARKEO 2743 : Archaeology/Roman Private Life
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2221, CLASS 2743 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
What was it like to live in the Roman world?  What did that world look, taste and smell like?  How did Romans raise their families, entertain themselves, understand death, and interact with their government? What were Roman values and how did they differ from our own?  This course takes as its subject the everyday lives of individuals and explores those lives using the combined tools of archaeology, architecture and art, as well as some primary source readings.  In doing so, it seeks to integrate those monuments into a world of real people, and to use archaeology to narrate a story about ancient lives and life habits. Some of the topics explored will include the Roman house; the Roman family, children and slaves; bathing and hygiene; food; gardens, agriculture and animals.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 3090 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARKEO 3235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  
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ARKEO 3550 : Origins of Monotheism
Crosslisted as: JWST 3550, NES 3550, RELST 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 3566 : Art and Architecture of the Pre-Columbian Americas
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3566, ARTH 6566, LATA 3566, LSP 3566, VISST 3566 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the arts of the ancient Americas from circa 2000 BC to the Spanish invasions of the 15th and 16th centuries. The inhabitants of the Americas produced outstanding works of art and architecture that showcased their diverse aesthetic contributions.  This course covers the arts of indigenous Mesoamerica (Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras), the Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and the Greater and Lesser Antilles), and Andean South America (Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile).  Students will become familiar with the history, archaeology, and visual arts of the earliest cultures that populated these regions up through the Inca, Aztec, and Maya cultures that encountered the Spaniards.  This course will also explore the legacies of pre-Columbian art in colonial, modern, and contemporary Latin America.
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ARKEO 3588 : Biblical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: JWST 3588, NES 3588, NES 6588, RELST 3588 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The purpose of the course is to place the Bible within the context of a larger ancient world that can be explored by systematic excavation of physical remains. Students will become familiar with archaeological excavations and finds from ancient Syria-Palestine from 10,000 bce to 586 bce. We will explore this archaeological evidence on its own terms, taking into consideration factors such as archaeological method and the interpretive frameworks in which the excavators themselves work, as well as the implications of this body of evidence for understanding the complexity and diversity of biblical Israel.
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ARKEO 3661 : Sumerian Language and Culture I
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6661, SUMER 3661, SUMER 6661 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is an intense introduction for undergraduate and graduate students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, and its cuneiform script. Each week will feature grammar lessons and a reading of an important Sumerian historical or literary work in English translation. Through lecture and discussion, the class will explore the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory, the origins of Mesopotamian civilization, and the role of the central government in the development of writing.
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ARKEO 4162 : The Inca Empire and its Colonial Legacies
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6162, ARTH 4162, ARTH 6162, LATA 4162, LATA 6162, VISST 4162 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the art and architecture of the Inca Empire (ca. 1438-1532), the largest indigenous empire in the Americas prior to the Spanish conquest. The first half of the course explores architecture, monuments, and portable arts from Cuzco, the capital of the empire, as well as smaller coastal and highland cities, to understand the complexities of Inca imperial aesthetics and their role in the administration of nearly 10 million inhabitants along the Andes mountain chain of South America. The second half of the course examines artistic production in modern-day Peru, Bolivia, and Chile during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Special attention will be given to the visual codification of collective memories of the Incas during the post-conquest era.
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ARKEO 4216 : Maya History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4216, ANTHR 6256, ARKEO 6256, LATA 4215, LATA 6256 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.
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ARKEO 4227 : Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4227, ANTHR 7227, ARKEO 7227 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will "put flesh on the bones" and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and 'third gender'; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.
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ARKEO 4233 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6233, ARTH 4233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 4746, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Fall 18 topic: Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Art and Archaeology of the Roman provinces as a 'sub-field' of Roman Archaeology has only recently gained traction in US academia, whereas in many European countries it still provides master narratives for national(ist) histories. Yet, in the wake of post-colonialism, the Roman provinces have proven fertile ground for more critical and theoretically informed archaeologies and art histories. What still needs more attention is the connectivity across provinces. The seminar therefore adopts a deliberately decentralized perspective. In looking at landscapes; infra-structure; production sites; military camps; the country side; urban centers; the material culture of domestic life and of the funerary realm, of religion, of gender and ethnicity we will emphasize interaction beyond or evading Rome. Rather than offering a systematic overview, the seminar proposes several lines of inquiry. Their main purpose is to interrogate the validity of several boundaries (geographical, methodological, theoretical, historiographical and institutional) that continue to define the field.
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ARKEO 4235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4235, ANTHR 7235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ARKEO 4263 : Zooarchaeological Method
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4263, ANTHR 7263, ARKEO 7263 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification. We will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels. While we will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America. This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting. You will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones. It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 4264/ARKEO 4264) offered in the spring.
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ARKEO 4264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4264, ANTHR 7264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method. We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones. We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality. We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human/animal relations.
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ARKEO 4268 : Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4268, ANTHR 7268, ARKEO 7268, LATA 4268, LATA 7268 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the "empire" of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.
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ARKEO 4272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, AMST 6272, ANTHR 4272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 7272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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ARKEO 4353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4353, CLASS 4755 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 4460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ARKEO 4670 : Wealth and Power: Political Economy in Ancient Near Eastern States
Crosslisted as: NES 4670, NES 6670 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Early states emerged when select groups gained control over wealth and power and institutionalized that control. How this was accomplished is a question of political economy that we can approach from archaeological, anthropological, and sociological perspectives. The course introduces students to the intellectual development of historical materialism in Smith, Marx, and Weber, among others, and traces their influence on later socioeconomic historians such as Polanyi and Finley. More recent approaches deriving from world-systems, gender studies, post-colonial studies, game theory, and network theory are then applied to case studies that include the emergence of a Mesopotamian state ca. 3400 BC, the Akkadian and Ur III empires, Old Babylonian and Old Assyrian trade, pharaonic Egypt, the international Late Bronze Age world, Aegean palatial civilization, and the Phoenicians. Students are welcome to present and write on other topics also. Monroe will provide context and clarification to assist with the specialist literature, but prior coursework in ancient studies will be advantageous in critically evaluating and writing about all the course readings.
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ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).
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ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.
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ARKEO 6162 : The Inca Empire and its Colonial Legacies
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4162, ARTH 4162, ARTH 6162, LATA 4162, LATA 6162, VISST 4162 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the art and architecture of the Inca Empire (ca. 1438-1532), the largest indigenous empire in the Americas prior to the Spanish conquest. The first half of the course explores architecture, monuments, and portable arts from Cuzco, the capital of the empire, as well as smaller coastal and highland cities, to understand the complexities of Inca imperial aesthetics and their role in the administration of nearly 10 million inhabitants along the Andes mountain chain of South America. The second half of the course examines artistic production in modern-day Peru, Bolivia, and Chile during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Special attention will be given to the visual codification of collective memories of the Incas during the post-conquest era.
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ARKEO 6233 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4233, ARTH 4233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 4746, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Topics rotate each semester.  Fall 18 topic: Archaeology of the Roman Provincs.
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ARKEO 6235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 3235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.
View course details
Description
ARKEO 6256 : Maya History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4216, ANTHR 6256, ARKEO 4216, LATA 4215, LATA 6256 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.
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ARKEO 6267 : Contemporary Archaeological Theory
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6267 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.
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ARKEO 6402 : Material Theory II: Assemblage & Object
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores recent efforts to theorize the materiality of human social, political, and cultural life. We will draw broadly from contemporary works in archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, art, social thought, media studies, and literary theory to piece together a sense of the conceptual possibilities afforded by analytical engagement with the world of things. We will take the historical dynamics of things as our central concern, navigating between classic and contemporary debates over the social location, physical constitution, and agency of object worlds. Along the way we will take in contemporary arguments for objects as constitutive elements of mind, affect, and order. The goal of the course is to juxtapose the experience, perception, and imagination of objects in order to address critical gaps in our understanding of social life past, present, and future. As the second course in a sequence focused on material theory, this seminar is part of a wider effort to train students to be astute analysts of the material world.
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ARKEO 6661 : Sumerian Language and Culture I
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3661, SUMER 3661, SUMER 6661 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is an intense introduction for undergraduate and graduate students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, and its cuneiform script. Each week will feature grammar lessons and a reading of an important Sumerian historical or literary work in English translation. Through lecture and discussion, the class will explore the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory, the origins of Mesopotamian civilization, and the role of the central government in the development of writing.
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ARKEO 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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ARKEO 7227 : Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4227, ANTHR 7227, ARKEO 4227 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will "put flesh on the bones" and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and 'third gender'; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.
View course details
Description
ARKEO 7235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4235, ANTHR 7235, ARKEO 4235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
View course details
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ARKEO 7263 : Zooarchaeological Method
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4263, ANTHR 7263, ARKEO 4263 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites.  It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification.  The course will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels.  While students will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America.  This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting.  Students will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones.  It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 7264/ARKEO 7264) offered in the spring.
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ARKEO 7264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4264, ANTHR 7264, ARKEO 4264 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is intended to follow on from Zooarchaeological Method in the fall; it is assumed that students have some familiarity with the nature of zooarchaeological material.  In this course, we will consider issues related to the interpretation of archaeological animal bones: quantification, seasonality, taphonomy, subsistence, the origins of hunting, animal domestication, modes of consumption, meat sharing, the use of secondary products (milk, wool, traction).
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ARKEO 7268 : Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4268, ANTHR 7268, ARKEO 4268, LATA 4268, LATA 7268 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the "empire" of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.
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ARKEO 7272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, AMST 6272, ANTHR 4272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 4272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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Description
ARKEO 7460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 4460 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ARKEO 7741 : Methods and Approaches in Current Archaeology
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7741 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar course aims to provide students with a review of, and encounter with, a key selection of the main methods and techniques used in current archaeological work, and to develop an understanding of the current practice of archaeology. Topics included are: (i) methods and practice in field archaeology (prospection, archaeological excavation and stratigraphy, survey archaeology and landscape), (ii) investigation of the climate and environmental context of the past, (iii) relative and absolute dating methods in archaeology, (iv) artifact analysis in archaeology (ceramics, stone, metals, etc.) and the role of the object in the discipline, and (v) approaches and issues in the analysis and interpretation of archaeological evidence (what questions to ask, and how to ask them).
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